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Ban With A Plan

Ban With A Plan

Join us! Let’s tell government that we need
a National Pollinator Recovery Action Plan.

The Importance of Species Recovery

Recent Developments

In Canada

April 2019. Health Canada announced the phase-out and restricted use of three neonicotinoids (clothianidin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam), but changes will not take effect until 2021. The restrictions were put in place due to impacts on aquatic insects rather than pollinators. Other countries, armed with the same scientific information, decided to ban the use of neonicotinoids due to impacts on pollinators. Actions are specific to each pesticide and are summarized in a chart by crop type.

In Other Countries

April 2019. After a petition to seek better protection of plant and animal species garnered 1.75 million signatures, the German state of Bavaria announced this year that they will pass a pollinator-protective law that requires 20 per cent of agricultural lands to meet organic farming standards by 2025, before reaching 30 per cent by 2030. Ten percent of green space in Bavaria will be turned into flowering meadows, and rivers and streams will be better protected from pesticides and fertilizers.
• January 2019. Paper: To solve pollinator health crisis in the United States, state governments are key. For the first time, researchers have catalogued every pollinator protection policy enacted by state governments from 2000 to 2017. The resulting database of information allows everyone from legislators to the general public to study how state lawmakers have addressed the pollinator health crisis over time.

What is Pollinator Recovery?

Pollinators, such as bees, butterflies, moths and flies, play critical roles in ecosystems and in the production of our food. If you’ve eaten an apple or worn a comfy cotton t-shirt, you can thank a pollinator for transporting pollen between those plants’ blossoms. Despite the important services they provide, the populations of many wild pollinators are declining, largely due to changes in their habitat, intensive agricultural practices and pesticide use, invasive species, disease and climate change.

The good news is that much can be done to bring pollinator numbers back.

  • We can create habitat by planting pollinator-friendly plants along roadsides, in parks, along utility corridors and even in our backyards and schoolyards!
  • We can support sustainable agricultural practices, such as crop rotation and retaining hedgerows.

  • We can ban the use of harmful pesticides.
Taken together, actions like these promote “pollinator recovery” and require attention from industry, governments at all levels and each of us.

Working with corporations, municipalities, provinces, territories and Indigenous Peoples, the action plan would:

  1. Create a National Pollinator Monitoring Program
  2. Establish habitat restoration projects in areas such as city parks, right-of-ways and along roadways to create pollinator pathways across Canada

Pollinators need a voice that only you can give. It is time for dedicated action to halt their decline.

Sign the Petition!

Dear Minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada,


I support the Canadian Wildlife Federation’s call for the creation of a national pollinator recovery action plan.
Working with corporations, municipalities, provinces, territories and Indigenous Peoples, the action plan would:

  1. Create a National Pollinator Monitoring Program
  2. Establish habitat restoration projects in city parks, right-of-ways and along roadways to create pollinator pathways across Canada

With this comprehensive approach that would include a ban on neonicotinoid pesticides, significant investment in alternative options for pest management and a robust pollinator recovery action plan, Canada could be a leader in environmentally sustainable practices. It’s critical to the survival of our pollinators, their habitat and the environment.



“It is imperative that we invest in initiatives to reverse the effects that pesticides and habitat loss have had on our pollinators. Together, we can do something about it and that is why planting a pollinator pathway across Canada and building a national monitoring program are key initiatives to stem the decline and build the numbers back up.”
Carolyn Callaghan, Senior Conservation Science Biologist | Canadian Wildlife Federation

“It is imperative that we invest in initiatives to reverse the effects that pesticides and habitat loss have had on our pollinators. Together, we can do something about it and that is why planting a pollinator pathway across Canada and building a national monitoring program are key initiatives to stem the decline and build the numbers back up.”
Carolyn Callaghan, Senior Conservation Science Biologist | Canadian Wildlife Federation

Five-Step Plan

In a recent open letter to the Prime Minister of Canada, the Canadian Wildlife Federation along with 15 non-profit environmental and human health organizations signed their support to urge our government to take immediate action to end the use of neonicotinoid insecticides in Canada in response to recent international developments and significant evidence of serious harm.

In addition, one of CWF’s scientists joined over 200 scientists in an open letter published in the journal Science to urge for immediate action from governments around the world to create national and international agreements to greatly restrict the use of neonics.

We’ve developed a five-step plan to not just ban neonics, but also work with farmers and policy-makers and help the environment recover from the devastating effects of these pesticides.

Ban the use of neonics

The Canadian Wildlife Federation calls for a legislated, national ban on the use of all forms of neonicotinoid pesticides in agriculture, horticulture, turf production and golf courses. Under the ban, emergency use of neonics would be permitted for a limited number of years, but only under cases of severe pest outbreak and with a prescription from a certified agronomist. View Results.

Recover Affected Species

Recover species impacted by neonics, including wild bees, hoverflies, other insect pollinators, aquatic insects, and species experiencing the indirect effects of neonics due to reduced food availability, such as birds, bats and fish. Sign the Petition >.

Encourage Research and Development on Safer Pest Control Technologies

Support the development of pest-specific chemicals (or biological agents) with limited environmental effects – to encourage the development of longer term, directed products.

Give Farmers Alternatives

We are encouraging banning the use of neonicotinoids (neonics), but a major component of this is a plan that helps support farmers in transitioning to alternatives to neonics while ensuring crop yields and quality. These supports include: extending the patent period for less harmful and/or better targeted insecticides so these products are more widely available; encouraging government programs to support integrated pest management and alternatives to neonicotinoids; improving agricultural extension on insect management; improving insurance programs to cover potential losses. More elements of the Plan are working with government, industry and others to better understand effects on non-target species, to improve academic and public scrutiny of studies by pesticide manufacturers, and establishment of an oversight committee without ties to industry.

Reform How the Government Protects Our Food Supply

Improve risk assessment methods for pesticides, including oversight and greater transparency in how pesticides are licensed and regulated, to ensure the seriously harmful pesticides are not licensed by the Canadian government.  End the licensing of systemic pesticides.

By The Numbers

%

Percentage of invertebrate pollinator species – particularly bees and butterflies – facing extinction.

%

Percentage of vertebrate pollinators (like birds and bats) threatened with extinction globally.

%

Flowering plants across the globe that are dependent entirely or in part on animal pollination.

What Can You Do?

Sign the Petition!

Join us! Let’s tell government that we need a National Pollinator Recovery Action Plan.

Create a Pollinator Pathway in Your Backyard

Create a banquet for pollinators by planting the favourite wildflowers of bees, butterflies and other insects.